Election Contests and Ballot Measures

November 2, 2010 Utah General Election

Utah

Note: Candidate pictures are the most current we have on file. Because this is a past election, they may not show a candidate’s likeness at the time of the election. Likewise, some of the links to websites, emails, and social media may be broken.
US Senate
Compare the candidates
Scott N. Bradley - CON
Websitewww.scottbradleyforsenate.com/
Sam F. Granato - D
Websitewww.voteforgranato.com
Mike Lee - R
Websitewww.leeforsenate.com
45
US House of Representatives
US House District 1
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Rob Bishop - R
Websitewww.votebishop.com
65
Morgan Bowen - D
Websitewww.bowenforcongress.com
Kirk D. Pearson - CON
Websiteconstitutionpartyofutah.com
54
Jared Paul Stratton - L
Websitestratton2010.wordpress.com
US House District 2
Compare the candidates
Dave Glissmeyer
Websitewww.congressmandave.org
Wayne L. Hill - IA
Randall Hinton - CON
Websiterandallhinton.com
Jim Matheson - D
Websitemathesonforcongress.com
57
Morgan Philpot - R
Websitemorganphilpot.com
45
US House District 3
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Jason Chaffetz - R
Websitewww.jasonforcongress.com
50
Karen Hyer - D
Websitewww.hyerforcongress.com
Joseph L. Puente
Websitewww.joepuente.org
Jake Shannon - L
Websitewww.jakeshannon.com
Douglas Sligting - CON
Websitewww.douglasforcongress.com
Governor
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Farley M. Anderson
Websitewww.independencemovement.org
Steven Maxfield
Websitewww.independencemovement.org
Peter Corroon - D
Websitewww.votecorroon.com
Sheryl Allen - D
Websitewww.votecorroon.com
Gary R. Herbert - R
Websitewww.garyherbert.com
69
Greg Bell - R
Websitewww.utah.gov/ltgovernor
68
W. Andrew McCullough - L
Websitewww.andrewmccullough.org
68
Aric M. Cramer, Sr. - L
Websitewww.cramerlathamlawyers.com
State Senator District 1
Ronda Rudd Menlove - R
Websitele.utah.gov/house2/detail.jsp?i=MENLORR
Utah House
State Representative District 1
Ronda Rudd Menlove - R
Websitele.utah.gov/house2/detail.jsp?i=MENLORR
State Representative District 2
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Becky Maddox - CON
Websitewww.utah-constitution-party.org/candidates/beckymaddox.html
Lee B. Perry - R
Websitewww.leeperryutah.com
50
State Representative District 3
Jack R. Draxler - R
Websitele.utah.gov/house2/detail.jsp?i=DRAXLJR
State Representative District 4
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David G. Butterfield - R
Websitewww.electbutterfield.com
Gilberto Urroz - D
State Representative District 5
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Paige Pagnucco
R. Curt Webb - R
Websitewww.curtwebb.us
67
State Representative District 6
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Brad J. Galvez - R
Websitewww.bradgalvezcampaign.com
Benjamin Pales - D
Websitebenpales.weberdemocrats.org
State Representative District 7
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Peter Conover Clemens - D
Websiteclemensforcongress.com
Ryan Wilcox - R
Websitewww.votewilcox.com
State Representative District 8
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Gage Froerer - R
Alan L. Wheelwright - D
State Representative District 9
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Neil A. Hansen - D
Jeremy Peterson - R
Websitele.utah.gov/house2/detail.jsp?i=PETERJA
State Representative District 10
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Dixon M. Pitcher - R
Websitele.utah.gov/house2/detail.jsp?i=PITCHDM
Randy Rounds - D
State Representative District 11
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Brad L. Dee - R
Websitele.utah.gov/house2/detail.jsp?i=DEEBL
Steven Gaskill
State Representative District 12
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Larry E. Cisney - D
Richard A. Greenwood - R
Websitele.utah.gov/house2/detail.jsp?i=GREENRA
State Representative District 13
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Paul Ray - R
Websitewww.paulray.org
50
Ben F. Wofford - D
Websitewww.benfwofford.politicalgateway.com
State Representative District 14
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Curtis Oda - R
Websitecurtisoda.wordpress.com
64
Christopher S. Williams - D
State Representative District 15
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Sherri Tatton - D
Brad R. Wilson - R
Websiteelectbradwilson.com
State Representative District 16
Stephen G. Handy - R
Websitestevehandyutah.com
66
State Representative District 17
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David A. Armstrong - CON
Websitearmstrong258.blogspot.com
Julie Fisher - R
State Representative District 18
Roger Edward Barrus - R
Websitewww.rogerbarrus.com
State Representative District 19
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Jim Nielson - R
Websitewww.jim4utah.com
Richard J. Watson - D
Websitewww.rwatsoncampaign.org
Reldon C. White - CON
State Representative District 20
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Becky Edwards - R
Robert G. Moultrie - CON
Websitewww.moultrieforhouse20.blogspot.com
William E. Ward - D
State Representative District 21
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Jonathan D. Garrard - CON
Websitewww.utah-constitution-party.org/candidates/jonathangarrard.html
James R. Gowans - D
Douglas V. Sagers - R
Websitele.utah.gov/house2/detail.jsp?i=SAGERD
State Representative District 22
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Susan Sue Duckworth - D
Noel Fields - R
Websitenoelfields2010.com
State Representative District 23
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Richard D.M. Barnes - R
Jen Seelig - D
Websitewww.jenseelig.com/
Mark T. Sweet - L
State Representative District 24
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Rebecca Chavez-Houck - D
Websiterebeccaforhouse.com
Thomas Olds - CON
Nephi J. Robinson - R
State Representative District 25
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Joel K. Briscoe - D
Websitewww.votebriscoe.com
Rick Raile - R
Websitewww.voterickraile.com
State Representative District 26
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Ben Kendrick - R
David Litvack - D
Websitewww.davidlitvack.com
State Representative District 27
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John Dougall - R
Websiteauditor.utah.gov
Jenn Payne - D
State Representative District 28
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James W. Farley - R
Brian S. King - D
Websitewww.kingforrep.com
61
State Representative District 29
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Janice Fisher - D
Websiterepjanicefisher.com
Shirene L. Saddler
State Representative District 30
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Jackie Biskupski - D
Sinama Meli - R
State Representative District 31
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Grace Sperry - R
Websitewww.votegracesperry.com
Larry B. Wiley - D
State Representative District 32
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Ron C. Bigelow - R
Merrill Humberg - D
Jennifer Schmith - CON
State Representative District 33
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Neal B. Hendrickson - D
Websitele.utah.gov/house2/detail.jsp?i=HENDRNB
67
John Huntinghouse - R
Websitewww.johnhuntinghouse.com
Referendums and Ballot Measures
Constitutional Amendment A Joint Resolution Regarding Secret Ballot
Shall the Utah Constitution be amended to specify that elections currently required to be by secret ballot include elections under state or federal law for public office, on an initiative or referendum, or to designate or authorize employee or individual representation? Current provisions of the Utah Constitution The Utah Constitution currently requires all elections to be by secret ballot. That requirement probably already applies to elections to select public officers and elections under state law on initiatives or referenda. However, because the scope of the requirement that "all elections" be by secret ballot is not defined in case law, it is unclear exactly which elections are included within the scope of the requirement. Effect of Constitutional Amendment A Constitutional Amendment A modifies the scope of the secret ballot requirement. Unless preempted by federal law, the Amendment requires specific types of elections to be by secret ballot. The Amendment specifies that elections required to be held by secret ballot include elections under state or federal law for public office, on an initiative or referendum, or to designate or authorize employee or individual representation. An election to designate or authorize employee representation would probably include an election to determine whether or not to form a union or to determine union representation. Effective Date If approved by voters, Constitutional Amendment A takes effect January 1, 2011. Fiscal Impact Constitutional Amendment A will have no direct, measurable impact on state or local government costs or revenues.
Constitutional Amendment B Resolution Regarding Eligibility For Legislative Office
Shall The Utah Constitution Be Amended To:* Specify The Residency Requirements For A Person Appointed To Fill A Vacancy In The Office Of State Senator Or State Representative; And* Prohibit A Person Appointed To The Office Of State Senator Or State Representative From Continuing To Serve In That Office If The Person Ceases To Be A Resident Of The District For Which The Person Was Appointed?Constitutional Amendment B Modifies A Provision Of The Utah Constitution Regarding Eligibility Requirements For The Office Of State Senator Or State Representative. The Amendment Requires A Person Appointed To Fill A Mid-Term Vacancy In One Of Those Offices To Be A Resident Of The State For Three Consecutive Years Immediately Before Appointment And A Resident Of The Legislative District For Six Consecutive Months Immediately Before Appointment. The Amendment Also Prohibits A Person Appointed To Fill A Vacancy In A Legislative Office From Continuing To Serve In Office After Ceasing To Be A Resident Of The District For Which The Person Was Appointed. Current Provisions Of The Utah Constitution The Utah Constitution Currently States That A Person Is Not Eligible For The Office Of State Senator Or Representative Unless The Person Meets Certain Requirements, Including Residency Requirements. The Residency Requirements Are That A Person Must Be A Resident Of The State For Three Consecutive Years Immediately Before The Deadline For Filing For Office And A Resident Of The District From Which The Person Is Elected For Six Consecutive Months Immediately Before The Filing Deadline. The Requirement To Be A Resident Of The State For Three Years Is Phrased In Terms That May Apply To Both A Person Who Is Elected To Office And A Person Who Is Appointed To Fill A Mid-Term Vacancy. The Requirement To Be A Resident Of The Legislative District For Six Months Is Phrased In Terms That Apply Only To A Person Who Is Elected To Office. The Utah Constitution Also Prohibits A Person Who Is Elected To A Legislative Office From Continuing To Serve In That Office After Ceasing To Be A Resident Of The District From Which The Person Was Elected. This Provision Is Phrased In Terms That Apply Only To A Person Who Is Elected To Office And Not To A Person Who Is Appointed To Fill A Mid-Term Vacancy. Effect Of Constitutional Amendment B Constitutional Amendment B Specifically Addresses Residency Requirements For A Person Who Is Appointed To Fill A Midterm Vacancy In A Legislative Office. The Amendment Requires A Person Appointed To Fill A Vacancy To Be A Resident Of The State For Three Consecutive Years Immediately Before The Person'S Appointment And A Resident Of The Legislative District For Six Consecutive Months Immediately Before The Person'S Appointment. The Amendment Also Prohibits A Person Appointed To Fill A Vacant Legislative Office From Continuing To Serve In That Office If The Person Ceases To Be A Resident Of The District For Which The Person Was Appointed. Effective Date If Approved By Voters, Constitutional Amendment B Takes Effect January 1, 2011. Fiscal Impact Constitutional Amendment B Will Have No Direct, Measurable Impact On State Or Local Government Costs Or Revenues.
Constitutional Amendment C Resolution On Property Tax Exemption For Water Facilities
Shall the Utah Constitution be amended to provide a property tax exemption to nonprofit entities for their:* water rights and specified facilities used within the state to irrigate land, provide domestic water, or provide water to a public water supplier; and* land occupied by and, under certain conditions, immediately adjacent to some of those facilities?Constitutional Amendment C provides a property tax exemption for certain property owned by nonprofit entities if the property is used to irrigate land, provide domestic water, or provide water to a public water supplier. It also provides an exemption for land occupied by or adjacent to some of that exempt property, under certain circumstances. Current provisions of the Utah Constitution The Utah Constitution currently provides a property tax exemption for all government owned and some privately owned water rights and facilities used to produce, treat, store, and distribute water in the state. Privately owned water rights and facilities are exempt only if the owner of the water rights and facilities uses them to irrigate the owner's own land within the state. The Utah Constitution does not presently provide a property tax exemption for privately owned water rights and facilities used to provide water for purposes other than the irrigation of land owned by the owner of the water rights and facilities. Effect of Constitutional Amendment C Constitutional Amendment C makes water rights and certain facilities owned by nonprofit entities exempt from property taxes if the water rights and facilities are used within the state to irrigate land, provide domestic water, or provide water to a public water supplier. Under a bill that becomes effective if Constitutional Amendment C is approved by voters, domestic water is defined as water used for a residential or commercial use, including the outdoor watering of vegetation. Constitutional Amendment C also provides an exemption for land that is occupied by an exempt reservoir, ditch, canal, or pipe if that land is owned by the same nonprofit entity that owns the reservoir, ditch, canal, or pipe. The Amendment also makes land exempt from property taxes if the land: is adjacent to an exempt reservoir, ditch, canal, or pipe; is owned by the same nonprofit entity that owns the reservoir, ditch, canal, or pipe; and is reasonably necessary for the maintenance of the reservoir, ditch, canal, or pipe or is reasonably necessary for supporting their operation. Effective date If approved by voters, Constitutional Amendment C takes effect January 1, 2011. Fiscal impact Constitutional Amendment C will reduce the property tax liability of certain water-providing nonprofit entities by an estimated cumulative amount of $400,000 per year. These tax savings could potentially translate into a cost saving for local water authorities that use water provided by the nonprofit entities. The reduction of the nonprofit entities' tax liability will not decrease local government revenue because the $400,000 tax burden will shift from the nonprofit entities to other taxpayers. The Amendment will have no direct, measurable impact on state government costs or revenues.
Constitutional Amendment D Resolution On Legislative Ethics Commission
Shall the Utah Constitution be amended to:* establish a five-member legislative ethics commission whose members may not include sitting legislators or registered lobbyists;* authorize the commission to conduct an independent review of complaints alleging unethical legislative behavior; and* authorize the Legislature to provide for:* procedures and requirements for filing a complaint;* the qualifications, appointment, and terms of commission members; and* commission duties, powers, operations, and procedures?Constitutional Amendment D establishes a five-member legislative ethics commission with authority to conduct an independent review of complaints alleging unethical legislative behavior. Current provisions of the Utah Constitution The Utah Constitution currently authorizes the Utah House of Representatives to punish a member of the House, and the Utah Senate to punish a member of the Senate, for "disorderly conduct." Although "disorderly conduct" is not defined in the Utah Constitution, the Legislature has interpreted that term to refer to a violation of the Legislature's Code of Official Conduct or to a legislator's improper conduct while acting as a legislator that would reflect discredit upon the House or Senate. The Utah Constitution also authorizes the House and Senate, with a two-thirds vote, to expel a member of its respective house for cause. The Utah Constitution does not specify the process that the House or Senate must use to decide whether to punish or expel a member but leaves it to each house to define that process. Effect of Constitutional Amendment D Constitutional Amendment D establishes a legislative ethics commission to participate in the process of evaluating complaints alleging unethical legislative behavior. Under the Amendment, the legislative ethics commission has authority to conduct an independent review to determine whether a complaint merits further consideration by the house of the member against whom the complaint is made. The decision whether to punish or expel a member of the Utah House of Representatives would remain with the House, and the decision whether to punish or expel a member of the Utah Senate would remain with the Senate. The Amendment requires the legislative ethics commission to have five members. It prohibits a sitting legislator or registered lobbyist from being a member of the commission. The Amendment also authorizes the Legislature to provide in its internal rules for: 1) the procedures and requirements for filing a complaint alleging unethical legislative behavior; 2) the qualifications, appointment, and terms of commission members; and 3) the duties, powers, operations, and procedures of the commission. Constitutional Amendment D does not affect the authority of the House or Senate to establish internal rules to govern other aspects of the process of determining whether to punish or expel a member. Effective date If approved by voters, Constitutional Amendment D takes effect January 1, 2011.
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